The Mindful Shooter: Zen and the Art of Replica Pistols

Zen Buddhism and replica pistol shooting. Two things that you might suspect don’t have much in common, but you’d be wrong…

Here’s the situation; you have got yourself a nice, accurate shooting replica, you have learned appropriate stance, grip and sight picture and yet, you still can’t get those shots to group the way you want. Maybe there’s a bit of your technique you have forgotten to work on? The bit that lives between your ears, for example? Like most activities that require intense concentration, shooting any kind of pistol needs mental as well as physical preparation if you are going to do it well.

Image: 3.0 Brazil via WikiMedia Commons

Something that many athletes and top sports people are now using to improve their focus and concentration is mindfulness, a concept taken from Zen Buddhism. In this article I want to talk about how this relates to replica pistol shooting. OK, I know, it’s probably not what you were expecting when you arrived at a site devoted to replica guns, but bear with me for a few moments – there may actually be something here for all of us. And don’t worry, there’s no extra charge and you won’t have to shave your head or give up burgers in order to use these techniques.

Kenjuu Do – The way of the pistol

One of the reasons I enjoy target shooting with replica pistols (or any other type of pistol) is that it demands absolute focus if you are to achieve consistently decent results. You just can’t shoot accurately if you’re thinking about that proposal that must be finished for Friday or whether that strange smell in your son’s bedroom really is incense as he claims or some other less socially acceptable herbal substance. After a good shooting session I generally feel strangely relaxed and worry-free. So I was fascinated to discover something called Kenjuu Do, a precept of Japanese Zen Buddhist philosophy which translates roughly as “the way of the pistol”. This uses pistol shooting both as a form of meditation and as a practical way to learn aspects of Zen Buddhism.

The ideogram for The Way of the Pistol

It may initially seem strange to talk about target shooting with a pistol as a form of meditation, but it actually makes sense if you think about it. Pistol target shooting isn’t just a physical act. Certainly you need to get things like grip, stance and breathing right but it also involves the correct mental preparation and approach. If your mental approach is wrong, you just can’t shoot well. I suspect that this need for focus and mental engagement while you’re shooting helps to distract you from the worries and concerns of everyday life and that this is part of what makes you feel relaxed and content afterwards.

Zen provides ways to tune your mental approach for target shooting and suggests that the approaches and techniques used to improve your shooting can also be applied to other aspects of your life. I’m not a Buddhist or a practitioner of Zen or any other philosophy but I do find some of the teachings relating to Kenjuu Do fascinating and I thought I’d share them with you. Will they make you a better shooter? Maybe. Will you become a Zen Master? Almost certainly not. But you might just learn something about our hobby and why it makes you feel the way it does.

The path to enlightenment via replica guns? Take a Crosman MKI and add a little bit of Zen philosophy…

Zen: Oneness of body and mind

Zen is based on a subset of Buddhist teaching and was originally propounded in China in the 8th Century before becoming established in Japan in the 14th Century. The word Zen is an English derivative of the Japanese word dhyana which means “to think“. It’s important to remember that Zen is not a religion in the conventional sense. That is, it does not ask you believe in anything supernatural nor does it offer a set of rules to be followed in order to receive benefits in an afterlife. Rather it provides guidance on how to live a satisfying and fulfilled life. In Zen Buddhist terms this is known as reaching enlightenment. Part of this involves achieving fusion between mind and body so that the two operate in harmony.

The Horyu-Ji temple at Nara was one of the earliest Buddhist temples in Japan

When Zen Buddhism reached Japan it became integrated with the existing warrior ethos and tempered with a more practical view of how to achieve enlightenment. This often used seemingly ordinary tasks such as flower arranging or gardening and used them as arts (or “Ways”) that helped lead to spiritual growth. These activities were not done just for their physical results but also because they helped to learn mindfulness, an attitude that can be applied to other things. Archery (Kyudo) and later pistol shooting were seen as perfect Zen activities which required a combination of physical discipline and mental focus. To me, one of th e most interesting things about Zen thinking is the way in which it can be applied to almost any activity (including of course, motorcycle maintenance!).

But how, you might reasonably ask, does all this relate to shooting your replica pistols? Well, let’s have a look at four linked precepts of Kenjuu Do and see if they can be used to improve your shooting. Bear in mind that I’m not in any way a Zen expert and what you have here is simply my understanding of how some elements of Zen can be applied to our hobby. To find out more about Zen Buddhism in general and Kenjuu Do in particular, you’ll find a link at the end of the article to a website that describes all of this in more detail.

The Empty Mind

“In shooting, you learn more about yourself than any other sport.”

Frank Higginson

One of the central tenets of Zen is the ability to remain calm and retain mental balance in all circumstances. This is called achieving mushin, an “empty mind”. This shouldn’t be confused with the state of mental blankness which can be induced simply by watching back-to-back episodes of America’s Next Top Model. In Zen terms, achieving an empty mind means focusing completely on the present moment, accepting responsibility for your actions and, where these haven’t achieved the desired result, calmly trying again without allowing emotions or thoughts of success or failure to intrude. Achieving an empty mind involves removing all of the seven “defilements” which can upset mental balance. These are:

    Happiness (Yorokobu)

    Anger (Okoru)

    Greed (Urei)

    Expectation (Omou)

    Sadness (Kanashimu)

    Terror (Osoreru)

    Surprise (Odoroku)

“Tranquillity in tranquillity is not true tranquillity; it is tranquillity in action that is the true tranquillity”

Extract from the Fudochi Shinmyoroku (Divine Record Of Immovable Wisdom) by the Zen priest Takuan

We all lead busy lives and these leave us constantly filled with conflicting thoughts and emotions. That’s perfectly normal. However, target shooting gives you the chance to practice consciously clearing away all of these. If you use a pistol capable of accurate shooting but you don’t achieve the accuracy you expect, the problem may lie in your mental approach. For example, does this sound familiar; you’re shooting a string of ten shots. You get to number eight, and you can see that all the previous shots are grouped nicely, right in the centre of the target. If you can just do as well with the next three, you’ll beat your own best previous effort… Except of course that you won’t. Because as soon as your mind is filled with the defilements of excitement and happiness, your shooting gets worse.

When you take up your stance for shooting, you should consciously try to practice ensuring that you don’t feel excitement, concern, stress, worry or anything else. Instead, focus completely on the present shot without thinking about previous or subsequent shots. It’s not easy, but if you can do it, this will almost certainly help you to shoot better. It’s the fact that accurate pistol shooting demands that you clear your mind before and during the activity that has led some people to describe this as a perfect example of Zen standing meditation.

One shot, then die

“When you do something, you should burn yourself completely, like a good bonfire, leaving no trace of yourself.”

Shunryu Suzuki, Sōtō Zen master and teacher

The Japanese phrase “Issha Zetsumei” is sometimes used in Kenjuu Do. The direct translation is something like “one shot and then die”. The concept comes from the idea of a dying soldier on the battlefield who has only a single shot left. This soldier will have no other opportunity to leave his mark upon the world other than through this single shot. Zen teaches that there are no second chances in life and that everything you do should be approached with 100% focus and attention, just like the dying soldier. Each thing you do, no matter how ordinary it may be, should be approached as if it is the single most important thing in your life.

If you are not completely focused on what you are doing, or if you start thinking about what has gone before or what may happen in the future, it distracts from the here and now and your performance suffers. This doesn’t necessarily mean that you should literally approach each shot as if it were your last, but rather that you must take each shot separately and individually. Zen teaches that people often spend too much time thinking about the past and planning for the future. If instead you focus completely on the present moment you will achieve more satisfactory results. When you are shooting, don’t be distracted by what has gone before or possible aggregate scores. Don’t get angry if the previous shot was bad or excited if it was good. Instead, remain calm and try to bring all your attention and focus to the present shot. Like achieving an empty mind, this isn’t easy and it takes conscious effort.

Focus on the target

“Right concentration keeps the mind and body working together properly… They will not miss the target, nor will they be deluded or distracted from the Right Path of Life.“

The teachings of Buddha

One of the things that Buddhism teaches is the importance of focus or “right concentration.” To whatever you are doing, you should give absolute concentration and avoid distraction or irrelevancy.

One of my favourite Zen parables concerns a Japanese Zen master archer. While teaching his young pupils, one day he told them that he wanted to demonstrate an important lesson. He had them cover his eyes so that he could not see, then he took aim and shot an arrow towards the target. The pupils were embarrassed to note that he completely missed the target – they had imagined that he would somehow use his Zen skills to shoot accurately even when he could not see the target. He removed the blindfold and explained that he wanted to illustrate that, if you want to succeed, you must always focus on the target.

OK, Duh! If you want to shoot accurately, you need to focus on the target. Who’d have guessed? But actually this idea links closely with the first two ideas. To shoot well, you must be completely focused on the target. If you allow yourself to be distracted by anything else you will shoot less accurately.

Intuitive awareness

“Thousands of repetitions and out of one’s true self perfection emerges.”

Zen saying

Another precept of Zen Buddhism involves attaining what is called an “intuitive understanding” of any activity. In part, this is achieved through frequent repetition. If you do something often enough, you cease to think about it consciously and instead it becomes understood at a much deeper level. This true of any activity but particularly those which require mental and physical co-ordination. Multiple world champion racing driver Ayrton Senna spoke about how, on a couple of occasions, he was able to set his fastest laps after attaining a state where he was no longer conscious of driving the car and instead seemed to be watching himself from outside. The same things apply to more mundane activities that we all undertake. When you drive to work in the morning, you almost certainly aren’t thinking about gear changes, braking points and steering. You have done these things so often that instead they become fused into a single activity which you do for the most part without conscious thought leaving you free to focus on the whole process of driving safely.

The same things apply to target shooting. If you are consciously thinking about your stance, grip, breathing, sight picture, score or any other specific element, you will not shoot well. If you practice often enough these things will become intuitive and automatic and you will reach a point where you will be able to focus instead on the process of shooting as a whole rather than thinking about its individual elements.

Conclusion

“The shooting practitioner does not look at the target for the result of his or her practice, but inward, for the target is not a target – it is a mirror. And if the heart is right, each shot clears away some more of the obstacles clouding the vision of one’s true nature.”

Zen in the art of pistol shooting website

If you can apply these four techniques to your shooting, you may be on the way to what Zen describes as “shooter, bullet and target as one.” If you achieve this, shooting ceases to be composed of several different activities and becomes instead a single, intuitively understood process where the shooter, the gun and the target are all involved. Zen also suggests that the mental disciplines and techniques developed for target shooting can be applied to everyday life – that’s one of the reasons that both archery and shooting are used as a part of the teaching of Zen philosophy.

This has been a very quick look at Zen as it relates to replica pistol shooting. I hope there is something here you may find useful and that may even help to improve your shooting. In shooting, as in many other activities, mental preparation and training can be just as important as other techniques. Zen thinking is one way of approaching this. And if anyone accuses you of wasting your time playing with toy guns in the future you can explain that you’re actually exploring the precepts of Zen philosophy!

May your aim be true and your shooting free of defilement.

Links

If you’re interested in learning more, here is a website that provides much more detail about both Kenjuu Do and Zen Buddhism:

https://www.bullseyepistol.com/zeninfo.htm

Many of the images used in this article come from a collection of photographs of real Samurai taken in Japan between 1860 and 1880. You can see more of the collection here:

History Collection Samurai photographs

Umarex Walther PPQ M2 update

ppqqu1

I promised at the end of the Umarex Walther PPQ M2 review that I’d post an update, and here it is. Has my opinion of this replica changed since the first review? Well, let’s have a look…

Reading back over the original review, it’s interesting to see how my initial reaction has modified after around four months of ownership and after having had a chance to compare the PPQ M2 to other 6mm replicas such as the Cybergun S&W M&P 9c and the KSC H&K P10.

However, before I talk about what the Walther PPQ M2 does, it may be worth mentioning something it doesn’t do. After the initial review was posted, a couple of people have asked why I didn’t mention that the PPQ M2 can be set to fire in full-auto mode. The reason is that it can’t – the Umarex PPQ M2 is semi-auto only. If you look at the rear underside of the slide, the PPQ M2 appears to have the same switch that is used on the Cybergun S&W M&P 9c to swap between semi and full auto modes. However, the switch is non-functional on the PPQ M2. Good thing too if you ask me. Full auto on a short-barrelled pistol is fairly pointless for target shooting and accelerates wear on all components. It may be useful if you want to use it for CQB skirmishing, but otherwise I can’t see much point.

ppqu4

Cybergun S&W M&P 9c (left) with fire mode selector switch (arrowed). The Umarex Walther PPQ M2 (right) appears to have a similar switch, but it is non-functional. You can also see the adjustment screw for the PPQ rear sight.

Quality and Reliability

Build and finish quality on the PPQ M2 seem very good indeed. Other than the issue with the slide failing to lock back (now fixed thanks to the Umarex repair service), I haven’t had any issues with this replica. There are no obvious signs of wear on any internal components and only slight wear to the paint on the top of the inner barrel. Otherwise the finish is holding up well. Looking at the PPQ M2 next to, for example, another VFC replica, the Cybergun S&W M&P 9c, the PPQ seems to be better made. Internal parts like the trigger system and the slide release are more robust on the PPQ and work more precisely. I also note that I failed to mention in the original review that the PPQ has a metal outer barrel and a brass inner barrel, both of which seem to very precisely made with good fit and movement. The slide and magazine releases are also metal, but the trigger is plastic, though robust and heavy-duty plastic.

ppqu6

Good fit of inner barrel/outer barrel/slide probably contributes to accuracy

Since posting the initial review, I have read a couple of other on-line pieces suggesting that the PPQ M2 has reliability issues. In particular, it has been suggested that the metal slide can split at the front edge of the ejection port. The alloy is certainly thin in this area, but so far, mine has not shown any tendency to split. My example is still fairly new (I have fired somewhere under 1000 BBs with the PPQ M2 to date), so I suppose this could be an issue which only affects well-used versions. However, I am aware of a knowledgeable and experienced owner who has fired more than 12,000 BBs with his PPQ M2 with only minor issues (a small internal spring came loose and the slide occasionally fails to lock back on empty). So, overall, I see no reason to change my initial claim that the PPQ M2 seems to be well made and finished and reliable.

Ambidextrousness (is that a word?)

In the original review, I praised the PPQ M2 because it can be configured for left-hand operation. This involves swapping the magazine release from the left to the right side. Eagle-eyed readers may have noticed that the photographs here show the pistol with the mag release back on the left. I’m embarrassed to admit that I found it hard to deal with a left-hand mag release. Although I soot mainly with my left hand, I guess that I’m so conditioned to swapping pistols to my right hand to drop out the magazine, that I can’t get used to doing it with my left. Time after time with the PPQ I’d automatically swap the pistol to my right hand to release the mag, only to realise that I needed to swap it back to my left hand. Finally, I gave up and reverted to a left hand mag release. If the PPQ was my only pistol, I’d probably get used to it in time. As it is, most other replicas need to be swapped to my right hand to release the mag, and I just can’t seem to get used to doing it the other way round on the PPQ. So, full marks to Umarex and VFC for providing a fully ambidextrous replica, and zero marks to me for failing to re-learn my pistol handling to take advantage of this.

Shooting

I gave the PPQ M2 reasonable marks for its accuracy at 6 yards in the original review, but I don’t think I emphasised enough that it shoots to the point of aim out of the box. This is so uncommon with replicas that it bears repeating. Fine-tuning with the hop-up (which incorporates a “v-notch” nub, claimed to give more stable spin to the BB) means that I can reliably place 0.2g and 0.25g BBs precisely where I’m aiming. This is very satisfying and is a massive help in any kind of action shooting. The fit of the brass inner barrel within the metal barrel and the fit of the outer barrel in the slide are very good indeed, which probably helps here. On many replicas, the opening in the front of the slide is oval, allowing the outer barrel to droop and the inner barrel can be a loose fit within the outer barrel, both of which can cause a replica to shoot low. Neither apply to the PPQ.

ppqu2

The only slight issue with shooting is that the notch in the rear sight is rather wide. The foreshortening effect of a photograph doesn’t show this clearly, but with the PPQ held at arm’s length, the front post looks rather small within the wide rear notch. It’s not a major issue: the sight picture is still clear in all conditions and this does accurately replica the sights on the original.

Blowback is notably strong and snappy (see the video review below). Shooting the PPQ M2 side-by-side with a KSC System 7 equipped H&K P10 (System 7 is claimed to have enhanced blowback), the PPQ seems to have the stronger blowback and the slide on the PPQ appears to move faster and more freely than on the KSC replica. The trigger on the PPQ is very good indeed when compared to other replicas. The single action only trigger pull is short, light, consistent and with no discernible creep. I’m still not entirely comfortable with the fact that I can’t de-cock this replica, nor apply a manual safety before storing it. Putting it in its box cocked and ready to fire feels wrong somehow, and there isn’t room in the box to store it with the magazine removed. But that’s how the original works, and it would be possible to de-cock by pulling the trigger with the magazine removed.

Accuracy seems to have improved with use. There are now fewer flyers and these are generally closer to the main grouping. At six yards, freestanding, it’s possible to consistently put 90% of shots in or touching the 1½” centre circle on the target. Best accuracy and consistency seem to be achieved when using 0.25g BBs. Gas consumption is good with 50+ shots from a single fill and I have experienced no leaks or loss of gas when filling.

ppqu5

The ergonomics of the Walther PPQ M2 are excellent. The grip has a pronounced hump at the rear, which looks a little odd, but this locks in to the base of the thumb, providing a comfortable, precise and firm grip. The slide and magazine releases are easily operated while gripping the pistol and the slide incorporates both front and rear cocking serrations.

Conclusion

ppqu3

So, four months on, how do I feel about the Umarex Walther PPQ M2? I still think it’s an absolute cracker. A combination of good ergonomics, good build quality and finish and excellent shooting ability at a reasonable price make this a winner. There aren’t many Walther replicas available (Umarex and Walther belong to the same group of companies and so Umarex has an exclusive license to produce Walther replicas) and it also makes a nice change to shoot something other than the ubiquitous 1911/Sig/Beretta 92 clones. Overall, the Umarex Walther PPQ M2 is as good as any 6mm replica I have tried and better than most. You really need to try one of these.

Video update

Related pages

Umarex Walther PPQ M2 original review

Cybergun S&W M&P 9c review

KSC H&K P10 review

Buy

You can buy the Umarex Walther PPQ M2 at Pyramid Air here.

Shooting in Thailand

Pistol Place contributor AdrianBP lives in Thailand with his wife Gung. Adrian recently had the opportunity to try some cartridge pistols at his local shooting club. Here’s his story…

Khao Keaw Rifle Club, Nakhon Sawan

Last year Gung and I visited the Khao Keaw Rifle Club which is about ten kilometers south of the provincial city of Nakhon Sawan in Thailand. Last Wednesday we decided it was about time (after a rather hectic eighteen months) that we followed up on our initial enquiries and went along to join.

01-entrance - Copy

“Khao Kaew” means “Green Mountain” and already had a well established shooting range when Gung was a little girl. In fact her father, a Major in the Royal Thai Army, was a friend of the owner. Despite the name, it caters more for pistol than rifle shooting and is an extremely well organised and efficiently managed establishment. Lifetime membership may be purchased for THB 2,500 (about GBP 50) or annual membership at THB 500. A guest may be invited to shoot, if accompanied by a member, for a nominal fee. As a foreigner, I would need a Thai referee and Gung was able to act as such; my “Tabian Bahn” (house registration document) proved my place of residence in Thailand.

Shooting prices are also fair and guns may be rented from the club for approximately GBP 20 including 25 cartridges and three targets. Additional ammunition may be purchased as required at about THB 500 for 25 cartridges (depending on the gun). A choice of .38, 9mm and .45 calibre pistols are available. There is a shop where you can purchase shooting-related accessories such as holsters, gun-slips, cleaning consumables, T-shirts, car stickers etc. Once we had registered, we were allowed to enter the range proper which lies though an exceedingly pleasant partially covered garden courtyard with seating and refreshments for sale (no alcohol, of course).

02-entrance hall - Copy

Luck was with us as we were informed that on the coming Sunday (the day before yesterday) the club would be hosting a beginners pistol shooting and marksmanship course which we could attend if we wished. We duly agreed and although arriving a little late, were quickly signed-in and found a place to sit in the (rather full) lecture room.

The course was given by three instructors in turn and was exceptionally good. It commenced by explaining the three main kinds of (practical) pistol you are likely to come across, giving as examples a S&W Model 19 revolver, a Colt 1911A1 and a CZ-75.

Basic operation and safe handling were explained, as well as club rules for carrying pistols at the range. Different types of cartridges were shown explaining both the metric and imperial systems of measurement and that favourite of the British press, the fact that very similar “calibre” bullets could in fact belong to very different cartridges. This was illustrated by comparing a .22 rimfire (short) against a .223 Remington!

The five basic parts of pistol marksmanship were then described (grip, stance, breathing, trigger pull and follow-through) in a clear and concise fashion. Slide-shows and video clips were used throughout and even though it was of three hours duration, with only a brief coffee break, everyone was glued to what the instructors had to say. Around eighty people were present, of which about a third were ladies. Most people had their own guns and it was fascinating, especially for an enthusiast like me, to see such a variety of different pistols.

Following lunch it was time to “have a go” and shoot some targets. A score of sixty or more would result in the basic marksmanship award… needless to say, I was a bag of nerves! Bar some clay shooting a couple of years ago and some rough shooting as a lad, I have relatively little experience of shooting firearms and in fact it had been some five years since I had done any full bore pistol shooting in Thailand, with that limited to about 300 rounds through a very limited selection of guns (a Glock 19, Beretta 92, a couple of Colt 1911s and a couple of S&W revolvers).

However, no time like the present and so Gung pushed me over to register and borrow a gun. On the Wednesday I had already been asked which calibre I would like and had decided on a Colt .45… I was now having second thoughts. However, one of the instructors volunteered his Colt Government Series 70 and so laden with fifty rounds, three targets, an empty magazine ejected from the pistol and said Series 70 with the slide locked back, it was over to the range!

03-shotting stalls - Copy

I wrote my name on each target and waited my turn. It was here that luck was certainly with me as it turned out the last instructor to speak, Khun Dtoey, had not only studied in the United States but also spoke fluent English. He promptly took me under his wing after first asking whether I spoke Thai (of which I do a little, but nowhere near as good as his English!) and how much shooting experience I had had.

The targets are quite large at half a metre in diameter and are designed for 25m/ 50m shooting. However, for this course we were shooting at 15m. I asked as to when another chance might arise should I fail to obtain the required sixty… probably not for another six months was the reply (talk about pressure!).

The magazine was a single-stack type, although I thought the grip larger than that normally found on a 1911. Loading with five rounds, my first shot scored… a (lucky) ten!… but it was during this first target that the gun started to jam and so after shot #6 K.Dtoey asked the owner whether it might be a good idea to change the recoil spring. It was at this point the bell was rung and shooting ceased whilst targets were retrieved and replaced (this is done manually; the gun is placed on the table in front and you are not allowed even to touch it whilst people are on the range. Magazines may be reloaded).

04-shooting stalls-close - Copy

Shooting at 15m for the award; maximum available range 25m to backstop

With a fresh target and a clear range the signal was given to continue. By now, my initial (reasonably good) shots had been replaced by two fliers caused, as K.Dtoey explained, partly by me not gripping the pistol correctly, but mainly because I was not making an uninterrupted trigger pull accompanied by the “surprise” shot (ie. I was “snatching” the trigger, perhaps trying to react to the recoil before the gun was fired, pulling it low and left). Even though I had done a little extra shooting using my KJW 1911 in the garden, even to the extent of wearing ear protection in an attempt to familiarise myself with shooting conditions at a cartridge shooting range, 6mm CO2 is not quite the same as .45 ACP!

05 KJW Practice - Copy

Practicing at home: KJ Works 6mm CO2 1911A1 from Suphanburi “BB Gunzone”… and hearing protection all the way from Helston Gunsmiths!

Following his advice and placing my left hand slightly further forward than I was used to (I am right handed) and with thumbs parallel instead of crossed, I sighted the gun and slowly squeezed off the next few shots, trying my best to ignore the impending recoil which of course only comes into play once the bullet has left the barrel. This resulted in eight shots placed a little high, but with a grouping centre to center of about 70mm… and a score meaning a badge would be mine (big grins!).

There was still one more target to shoot and although the grouping was not so good it resulted in a higher score of 82 as against to 77. Although I realise many would be able to shoot much better than this (after all, “ratio” wise the 500mm target at 15m is in fact twice the size of the UBC 10m target and a third as big as the scaled target for shooting at 18 feet), I was still very pleased (understatement of the year!) and with practice hope to be able to improve on these scores, especially by placing the impending recoil, which you soon become accustomed to, out of my mind. By now I figured it was time to vacate my place at the range as there were still plenty of people waiting to shoot. Unused ammunition, of which I still had 24 rounds, was returned and a refund given (standard procedure at the club).

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Target #2 – the two “fliers” came before K.Dtoey stepped in! K.Dtoey has represented Thailand several times at international level and is a qualified shooting instructor.

I am very much indebted to K.Dtoey and know for a fact that without his assistance, patience and instruction I would have fared very differently indeed. I would also like to add that along with my attempts at clay shooting in the UK and our trip to the UBC Meet a couple of years ago, this is yet another example of just how knowledgeable, interesting, responsible and above all friendly members of the shooting community are… wherever in the world you may happen to be. Thank you to everyone at “Khao Keaw”.

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Target #3 complete with car sticker, certificate and badge. In all the excitement, we forgot to take a picture of the gun, but I think the size of the bullet holes speak for themselves (scoring rings are 25mm apart, target shot at 15m).

By AdrianBP

 

Related pages

Replicas vs firearms